Tag Archives: Korea

PHOTOS: A Walk Through Seoul’s Noryangjin Fish Market

After riding for an hour through Seoul’s labyrinthian subway system, my travel partner Jane and I finally emerged from the web of underground, air-conditioned tunnels into the pressing South Korean summer heat. Our mission was to find Seoul’s Noryangjin fish market. Wandering through the markets, especially markets that supply meat and vegetables to the local populace, is one of my favorite activities in Asian cities, towns and villages, so I knew that a visit to Noryangjin was definitely something I had to check off my list of to dos in Seoul. From the subway stop, finding the market was easy. Jane and I meandered through some side alleys that were scattered with vegetable peddlers selling chillis, bean sprouts and fresh tofu. As we got closer to the fish market, we began to see stalls stocked with buckets of writhing eels for sale.

For being a massive fish market, Noryangjin smells remarkably unfishy. The market is housed inside a large warehouse-like building with high ceilings and large open sides that allows for adequate ventilation. The complex was also kept remarkably clean. Vendors wearing rubber rain boots sat in plastic chairs in front of their fish tanks and aquariums. Noryangjin was generally divided into sections: in one area there were the live fish, in another sting rays and in yet another there was raw fish bits mixed with red spicy sauce in large vats. Around each turn vendors called out to us, offering fresh fish and sashimi of all varieties. Jane and I decided to take up a few of the vendors on their offer and we tasted the freshest sashimi possible: killed, deboned and sliced right in front of our eyes. The first vendor we went to retrieved a small fish from the aquarium, knocked it out, sliced and gutted it, flayed it for sashimi and served it to us with a side of daikon radish and red spicy sauce for dipping. Of course, it tasted as fresh as can be: it was light, slightly chewy and perfectly satisfying. After our first fish sashimi we decided to go for a fresh squid sashimi to add some texture variation to our sea food taste testing adventures.

We finished up our squid, waved goodbye to the vendors and continued on, winding up and down the lanes, admiring shell fish, massive sting rays, pyramids of larger fish and live crabs. Tucked near the back of the market was a section where already chopped sashimi mixed with the ubiquitous red Korean spicy sauce was for sale in large tubs. With toothpicks we tasted tiny morsels of different spiced fish varieties.

Here is a collection of photos from our walk through Noryangjin:

Above: A bucket brimming with dried shrimp.
Above: The entrance to Noryangjin Fish Market.  The vendors sit in front of their aquariums, plying visitors with offers of fresh-out-of-the-water sashimi.
Above: A woman wraps up a piece of tentacle for a customer.
Above: Fresh octopus laid out on display.
Above: We bought some fresh sashimi from the vendor.  He plucked the fish from the water, killed it and sliced it right in front of our eyes.
Above: A vendors shows a customer the small octopi for sale at her station.
Above: I get ready to dig into our fresh sashimi.
Above: After the delicious first try of fish sashimi, we decided to try some chewy, fresh squid too.
Above: Fish choices at the market.

Above: Sting rays on display.
Above: A woman organizes her piles of fish at the market.


Above: A bucket full of tiny shrimp.

PHOTOS: Seoul by Night

Long after the sun sets in Seoul, the city pulses frenetically. From the hulls of small restaurants comes the raucous sounds of friends and colleagues enjoying a round or two or three of soju, the country’s favorite distilled alcohol. Plumes of smoke waft onto the street from fiery Korean barbeques, covered with slabs of sizzling pork and beef. The petite women of Seoul, dressed to impress, parade up and down the streets, perfectly made-up and wearing impossibly high stilletos. Street vendors serve trays of spicy toppoki and bowls of steaming oysters. Seoul by night is an energetic, frenzied, eurphoric, non-stop spectacle.

Korea’s capital, like nowhere else I’ve ever seen, truly is the city that never sleeps. The nightlife thrives late into the night and into the early (and not so early) hours of the morning. (Yes, I had one night/morning in Seoul that lasted until 11 a.m.). A big part of understanding Seoul is to partake in the nightlife, but be warned: when enjoying Seoul by night it is necessary to pace oneself because young Koreans can easily stay up drinking, eating and enjoying themselves until the sun rises.

Above: Crowds flow through the neon-lit streets.
Above: The sun has just set in Seoul, which means the night is very, very young.
Above: Couples and friends stroll through the streets, many looking for a delectable restaurant to stop at.
Above: A couple decides what they want for dinner.  Many restaurants have displays of plastic food in front so potential customers can easily chose what they want.
Above: A plastic food display in Seoul.
Above: A couple sits at a street food vendor’s stall who is serving steamed shell fish.  The man pours fresh glasses of soju, the Korean distilled alcohol.
Above: Traffic flows smoothly as people return from work.
Above: A woman decides what she wants for dinner from a street vendor.
Above: One of the best things about Seoul by night are the neon lights.
Above: Bright lights, big city.
Above: The night is young and the revelry is just getting started.